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Tabatha Mills

Tabatha Mills

Tabatha Mills, Anchor/Reporter

Tabatha Mills is a Bakersfield, California native. She spent most of her childhood on a farm, in a ballet studio or on the basketball court. All three still hold a very special place in her heart. Given her basketball background she's very excited to now live in Lawrence, the home of the University of Kansas Jayhawks.

Tabatha attended college at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, California. She majored in agribusiness and minored in agricultural communications, journalism, marketing, and theatre. After graduating she worked in the California rodeo system as a marketing and public relations manager. She then interned with the Tampa Bay Rays in Florida as an on-field in-game coordinator. After that, she found herself in front of the camera working as an anchor and reporter in east Tennessee. That was until that fateful day that she applied at 6News and knew from the first email she received from News Director Lindsey Slater that she wanted to join the 6News team!

Outside of work, Tabatha enjoys volunteering for various organizations whenever she can. She loves working with children and given her chipper attitude, they love working with her. She also enjoys the arts and all they encompass. From music, to movies, to art exhibits. There's a good chance you can find her enjoying something arts related.

Tabatha said it is her goal every day to bring a smile to someone's face. If you've ever spent 20 minutes with her, you'll probably leave with one.

In ending her bio, she had a few things to say. The first, something her father says to her nearly every day: "Gabba Gabba Hey."

The second, her favorite: "Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. You're playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine as children do. It's not just in some of us; it is in everyone. And as we let our own lights shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others." - Marianne Williamson

You can find Tabatha on Facebook here and follow her on Twitter here.
Farm to fork was the idea.  Today at the 15th annual Slice of Ag event at the Douglas County Fairgrounds, local fourth grade students had the chance to learn where one of their most favorite foods, pizza.

"Our main goal is to teach them where their food comes from," said Kaytlin Peine, a 4-H youth development agent in Douglas County.

More than 900 youngsters rotated through 8 stations, or 8 slices, that taught them how some of things they enjoy on their pizza pies are made.

"I didn't know you could get pepperonis from a pig.  It's interesting because it's on pizza and I didn't know parts of pizza were from a pig," said Alexis Austin, a fourth grade student at Prairie Park Elementary.

"What I've learned so far is pretty cool," said Hunter Kirkland, also a fourth grade student at Prairie Park Elementary.

For some, it was a first.

"I've seen a cow before but I haven't seen a pig before," said Austin.

It was also eye opening.

"I didn't know that cows had to eat that much for them to give us milk," said Austin.

Everyone there learned a thing or two.

"Soil erosion, surface water, there's a lot of things about water that people know and don't know," said Kirkland adding, "There's many things that you can get from cows and pigs, like meats and some products like brushes, gum, glue, and then you can get fertilizer."

Which was exactly the point, or you could say, the slice of the day.

"As we continue to progress in society it's just going to be more important that we focus on food production and where our food comes from," said Peine.

The event was hosted by the Douglas County K-State research and extension office and made possible thanks to the help of dozens of local farmers, ranchers, producers and volunteers.


Farm to fork was the idea.  Today at the 15th annual Slice of Ag event at the Douglas County Fairgrounds, local fourth grade students had the chance to learn where one of their most favorite foods, pizza.

"Our main goal is to teach them where their food comes from," said Kaytlin Peine, a 4-H youth development agent in Douglas County.

More than 900 youngsters rotated through 8 stations, or 8 slices, that taught them how some of things they enjoy on their pizza pies are made.

"I didn't know you could get pepperonis from a pig.  It's interesting because it's on pizza and I didn't know parts of pizza were from a pig," said Alexis Austin, a fourth grade student at Prairie Park Elementary.

"What I've learned so far is pretty cool," said Hunter Kirkland, also a fourth grade student at Prairie Park Elementary.

For some, it was a first.

"I've seen a cow before but I haven't seen a pig before," said Austin.

It was also eye opening.

"I didn't know that cows had to eat that much for them to give us milk," said Austin.

Everyone there learned a thing or two.

"Soil erosion, surface water, there's a lot of things about water that people know and don't know," said Kirkland adding, "There's many things that you can get from cows and pigs, like meats and some products like brushes, gum, glue, and then you can get fertilizer."

Which was exactly the point, or you could say, the slice of the day.

"As we continue to progress in society it's just going to be more important that we focus on food production and where our food comes from," said Peine.

The event was hosted by the Douglas County K-State research and extension office and made possible thanks to the help of dozens of local farmers, ranchers, producers and volunteers.



























Did you know in Lawrence, male high school students graduate at a lower rate than female students? According to Lawrence Public Schools, in 2013-2014 the Lawrence graduation rate for males was 88.2 percent, while the female graduation rate was 95.3 percent. At Free State High School a new LEAP ambassadors program is looking to increase the graduation rate of male students through Business and Community Mentors.

"They are role models. I think especially when you talk about people who are former athletes or you know we have a vice president of a bank, they give our kids hope and inspire them to do something great and learn more about their field," said Keith Jones, Assistant Principal at Free State High School

Mentors who've signed up for the program include former KU athletes, school district and university leaders and local non-profit directors.

"I get to meet with Wayne Simeon and that will be fun because he's athletic and I'm all into sports. That's pretty cool," said Gage Foster, a Free State student in the LEAP program.

On Wednesday the mentors were invited to Free State to meet their matches.

"We're telling them what's going on with the school and what's going on with us. And we're just going to teach them how Free State works and get to know them a little bit," said Zach Sanders, also a Free State student involved in LEAP.

Jones said the mentor meet and greet started students on the path to graduation.

"They want to do whatever they can do to help our kids be successful," said Jones.

Students at Eudora Elementary rocked out with former America's Got Talent contestants Reverse Order on Tuesday. The band performed a few hit songs before focusing on a big issue across the nation right now, bullying.

With a theme of "Reversing the Trend", the musicians encouraged children to rise above bullying by sharing personal stories about how they overcame bulling.

Each member of the band let students know they are not alone, motivating them to achieve greatness.

Reverse Order will perform at multiple Kansas schools throughout the week.

A group of 8th grade students at Southwest Middle School will soon represent Lawrence on a national stage.

The reason? The Future City Competition. Nora Agah, Jared Cote and Claire Feddema recently took first place in the Great Plains Regional Competition and are now setting their sights on Washington D.C.

"We are currently preparing for nationals," said Feddema

Not sure what Future City is? Well you're not alone. Here's the short answer:

"They have to project forward at least 150 years and solve a problem," said Danielle Lottin-Barker, teacher at Southwest Middle School.

"There is a global food crisis. The real issues were climate change, fresh water shortages and lack of space due to rising populations," said Agah.

"We're solving a large problem within a city that we create and can change exponentially," said Cote.

Together the team has traveled 150 years into the future to develop sustainable farming.

"We came up with a food system where we actually grow kale and mussels, kale as our vegetable, mussels as our crop. Because we are running out of land space and we have rising populations which are going to be a huge problem in the future. We try to feed our entire population of 2.5 million with mainly kale and mussels and then we use community gardens to grow other crops," said Agah.

Working with local engineers and other professionals, the team has expanded their knowledge in areas including math, social studies, communications, and of course engineering.

At the national competition the team will be judged in numerous areas, which will include a seven minute presentation followed by a 15 minute Q & A session by some of the nation's most successful scientist and engineers. They will compete against 37 teams from around the nation. Sounds tough right? But the young time travelers said they're excited and ready.

The 7th grade team at Southwest Middle School also competed in the regional competition and earned high honors.

Liberty Memorial Central Middle School was represented by two teams at regionals, the 7th grade team won the prize for Most Holistic Approach, and the 6th grade team was awarded Best Infrastructure. West Middle School received the Sustenance Award. St. John's also received a special award. A team from Eudora was named 4th place overall.

Friday, 23 January 2015 18:39

Ladybird Diner celebrates National Pie Day

Friday is National Pie Day! Here at 6News we love pie! We stopped by the Ladybird Diner to see how they are celebrating this tasty day!

President Barack Obama gave a lesson on middle class economics at University of Kansas on Thursday.

"Right now in 31 states high quality childcare cost more than a year of tuition at a state university," said Obama.

The president reiterated his desire to create affordable and safe childcare for middle and low income families, as a part of his new policy.

"We can do more to help families make ends meet" said Obama.

That policy also includes a raise in minimum wage.

"If there are members of congress who really believe that they can work full time and support a family on less than $15,000.00 a year then they should try it," said Obama.

He also touched on affordable higher education and his plan to offer all citizens free tuition for two years at the junior college level.

"I want to get to yes on more young people going to college and not being loaded up with debt," said Obama.

But how will that be paid for?

"Let's have a tax code that lets middle class citizens get a leg up in the new economy. It makes a good investment that will ultimately be good for everybody," said Obama.

With two years left in office, a political analyst said the President is laying down what could very well be his legacy.

"This was not a political speech aimed for today, it's aimed for the next 20 years. He's trying to reshape the way Americans see our government the way Regan did," said Robin Rowland, Communications Studies Professor at the University of Kansas.

A legacy that could be very different from any president before.

"This is the time a lot of Presidents typically turn to foreign policy and for Obama to be making these statements on domestic policy and try to advance an agenda, you know some call it aggressive. It's unusual for a President," said Patrick Miller, Political Science Professor at the University of Kansas."

Boys & Girls Club of Lawrence members are estatic about President Barack Obama's trip to Lawrence.  

So we aske them, "What do you think about the president stopping in Lawrence?"  

Then followed that question up with, "If you met him what would you ask him?"  

Here's what they said:

 

Lawrence residents will vote to fill three seats on the Lawrence City Commission in 2015.  Lawrence resident Gary Williams has filed to run for one of those seats.  Below is a little bit about why Williams decided to run.

WOW! 6 will continue to interview candidates as the file to run.

The primary election is set for March 3, 2015 with the general election following on April 7, 2015.

For those interested in running for city commission the filing deadline is noon on January 27, 2015.

Williams can be reached through his website.  To be directed to Williams website, click here.

She's one of his biggest fans, but she has some pretty big fans herself, who helped her secure a ticket to see the president in person on Thursday.

Danielle Kriner was heartbroken when her chance to see President Barack Obama speak in Lawrence almost didn't happen.

"I was actually at work and I had to work a double," said Kriner.

The single mother of four signed up to work overtime at the front desk at the Roadway Inn on the very day tickets were released for the President's event at Anschutz Sports Pavilion on the University of Kansas campus.

But little did she know her family, coworkers and even boss, were cooking up a little something to get her a ticket to see her idol.

"I sat there and I go 'it's a once in a lifetime opportunity, go ahead and go I'll take care of and watch the desk for you,'" said Randy Disoso, the General Manager at Roadway Inn.

Here's what happened, unknowingly, as Kriner sat at work on Tuesday her mother went to stand in line. Then Kriner said a co-worker showed up to cover part of her shift. After that, her boss stepped in, giving Kriner the chance to get her ticket to see the president.

"It's something that doesn't happen all the time for Lawrence," said Disoso.

"Oh it's awesome I never thought I'd get the opportunity to do it and I'm really excited to do it," said Kriner.

Not too long ago Kriner said she was going through a little bit of a dark time, but now she said things are changing.

"It's a huge bright spot for me. I've been through a lot kind of starting over from scratch so this is going to be pretty awesome," said Kriner.

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