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Tabatha Mills

Tabatha Mills

Tabatha Mills, Anchor/Reporter

Tabatha Mills is a Bakersfield, California native. She spent most of her childhood on a farm, in a ballet studio or on the basketball court. All three still hold a very special place in her heart. Given her basketball background she's very excited to now live in Lawrence, the home of the University of Kansas Jayhawks.

Tabatha attended college at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, California. She majored in agribusiness and minored in agricultural communications, journalism, marketing, and theatre. After graduating she worked in the California rodeo system as a marketing and public relations manager. She then interned with the Tampa Bay Rays in Florida as an on-field in-game coordinator. After that, she found herself in front of the camera working as an anchor and reporter in east Tennessee. That was until that fateful day that she applied at 6News and knew from the first email she received from News Director Lindsey Slater that she wanted to join the 6News team!

Outside of work, Tabatha enjoys volunteering for various organizations whenever she can. She loves working with children and given her chipper attitude, they love working with her. She also enjoys the arts and all they encompass. From music, to movies, to art exhibits. There's a good chance you can find her enjoying something arts related.

Tabatha said it is her goal every day to bring a smile to someone's face. If you've ever spent 20 minutes with her, you'll probably leave with one.

In ending her bio, she had a few things to say. The first, something her father says to her nearly every day: "Gabba Gabba Hey."

The second, her favorite: "Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. You're playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine as children do. It's not just in some of us; it is in everyone. And as we let our own lights shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others." - Marianne Williamson

You can find Tabatha on Facebook here and follow her on Twitter here.
Bicyclist, walkers, runners, even drivers, listen up. Do you have any wishes or concerns about transportation in Lawrence? The city wants to hear from you.

In coordination with the City of Eudora and Baldwin City, you can now take survey on the City of Lawrence website to help identify transportation priorities included in a Regional Pedestrian Plan.

"This survey is really to get out and talk to the community about how they walk, about what types of improvements are important to them and looking at destinations and having people prioritize the importance of access," said Jessica Mortinger, Transportation Planner for the City of Lawrence.

The input collected will be combined with sidewalk and ADA ramp inventories to draft a plan that will make Douglas County more pedestrian and bike friendly. The plan will take into consideration to five E's: Engineering, Education, Encouragement, Enforcement and Evaluation.

Eudora and Baldwin will use the information for the same purpose.

To take the survey, click here.

It's called the Bank Build. Seven banks have joined forces with Lawrence Habitat for Humanity to build the non-profit's 87th house. The house will become a home to a local single dad and his daughter who have fallen on hard times. For that reason and others, Habitat Executive Director, Lori Harse, said the Bank Build program is simply amazing.

"This is a great collaboration of some local banks that hasn't happened before with Lawrence Habitat for Humanity," said Harse.

Construction on the home officially began on Saturday with the traditional nail driving ceremony. This will be the third house built in the newest Habitat Neighborhood, near 17th and Lindenwood in East Lawrence.

Harse also added, Habitat does not give away homes. In fact the non-profit builds and sells houses to homeowner partners through zero-interest loans. Homeowners make mortgage payments every month that doesn't exceed 30 percent of their monthly income. Habitat homeowner's incomes are 30 to 60 percent of the median income in Lawrence. Adults living in the house must put in 225 hours of sweat equity.

For more information about Lawrence Habitat for Humanity, click here.

KU Art and Design welcomed a special guest and alumnus to campus on Thursday. Kiel Johnson is a renowned artistic force in the contemporary art world.

His work can be seen in galleries in New York City, Los Angeles and other prominent cities around the world. Johnson also frequently presents at TED Talks.

On top of all of that, he's a graduate of the KU visual art sculpture and drawing programs. He said his success is all because of his experience up on the Hill.

"The stuff I learned here in the four years, I think about it every day. The stuff that I took from here, anything I learned along the way the last 16 or 17 years that I can bring back to the students, I love that," Johnson said.

Johnson met with students and gave a public lecture on campus.

Youngsters have the chance to let their inner artist shine to celebrate fair housing in Lawrence. As April is just around the corner and the month is designated as Fair Housing Month across the nation.

The Lawrence Human Relation Commission, in partnership with Lawrence Public Schools and the Lawrence Douglas County Housing Authority, is holding a fair housing poster and art contest.

It's open to all Lawrence Students K-12 to get creative and embrace the theme of Lawrence Celebrating Diverse Neighborhoods.

"We wanted to spur both a broader discussion about what fair housing is in the community as well as get more people involved than we have in the past," said Scott Wagner from the City of Lawrence.

All entries must be post marked or submitted online by March 28. Finalist will be displayed at Lawrence Public Schools and winning entries will be recognized at the Lawrence City Commission Meeting on April 28. For more information, click here.

The local general election is just around the corner and candidates are busy campaigning to win a seat on the Lawrence City Commission.

Fourteen candidates set out to fill one of three seats. The primary election on March 3, narrowed the field to six candidates. The complete list of candidates still in the race includes: Stuart Boley, Matthew Herbert, Stan Rasmussen, Terry Riordan, Bob Schumm and Leslie Soden.

Current Commissioner Mike Dever elected not to run again. Commissioners Bob Schumm and Terry Riordan hope to retain their seats.

Schumm is a veteran to in the city commission race and hopes his experience and knowledge of Lawrence will help him retain his current seat on the board. As a longtime Lawrence business owner, Schumm also brings his record of success and diligence in that industry to the table. Currently, he is passionate about the Ninth Street Corridor Project, bring fiber capabilities to the city and finding a resolution to fit the needs of the Lawrence Police Department. Click here, to find out more about Schumm's campaign.

Find out more about the candidates during on the WOW! 6 Election Special available OnDemand. You can also catch all election coverage on www.6lawrence.com.

The general election is Tuesday, April 7.

Two candidates are vying for an unexpired seat on the Lawrence School Board. Four people set out in January to fill the seat for USD 497, the primary election on March 3, narrowed the field to 2.

WOW! 6 sat down with both of the candidates in the local election to learn more about their platforms.

Current Lawrence School Board member Marcel Harmon hopes to once again hold a seat on the board. Marcel was appointed to his current position on the board unanimously by his peers to fill a vacancy left when another member retired. Harmon said the future for Lawrence Schools can be bright, even with concerns about the budget, among other things. As a parent of children in Lawrence Schools, Harmon hopes to help make sure the school district's future is bright. Below is a little more about his experience and his priorities if elected to the unexpired position.

Find out more about the candidates during the WOW! 6 Election Special on Tuesday, March 24. You can also catch all election coverage on www.6lawrence.com.

The general election is Tuesday, April 7.

Two candidates are vying for an unexpired seat on the Lawrence School Board. Four people set out in January to fill the seat for USD 497, the primary election on March 3, narrowed the field to two.

WOW! 6 sat down with both of the candidates in the local election to learn more about their platforms.

Former Lawrence School Board member Mary Loveland hopes to once again hold a seat on the board. Loveland has held positions on the board off and on since 1987. She feels her experience and knowledge of the school system will greatly help her fulfill the duties of the position. Below is a little more about her experience and her priorities if elected to the unexpired position.

Find out more about the candidates during the WOW! 6 Election Special on Tuesday, March 24. You can also catch all election coverage on www.6lawrence.com.

The general election is Tuesday, April 7.

After a five day trial last week, a jury found Sarah Gonzales McLinn guilty of first-degree murder. On Monday, they decided she was eligible for a "Hard 50" sentence, meaning she would have to serve 50 years in prison before she would be eligible for parole.

"This is what I've told her, that these proceedings are like a war and we lost a huge, huge battle when we lost the trial, but that doesn't mean the war is over," said Carl Cornwell, McLinn's attorney.

McLinn is accused of killing 52-year-old Lawrence businessman Harold Sasko on January 14, 2014. According to testimony, she drugged Sasko by crushing sleeping pills and putting them in his beer. After he became unconscious, she bound his wrists and ankles with zip ties, and cut his throat with a large hunting knife. McLinn admitted to the crime and said she wanted to know what it felt like to kill a person. She even said she practiced killing rabbits before murdering Sasko.

Cornwell was relying on the defense of not guilty by mental disease or defect. A psychologist testified that McLinn was diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder, or multiple personality disorder.

"It's a difficult case. Anytime you have a case where a homicide has occurred especially one, that as the jury found, was so heinous," said Charles Branson, Douglas County District Attorney.

The questions on the table now, will McLinn be granted the option of parole after 25 years or 50 years? The state is asking for a Hard 50 sentencing, which the jury on Monday agreed McLinn is eligible for.

"It was the state's position that no matter what the diagnosis was, it didn't deny the intent to commit the crime," Branson said. "As the defense's own witness indicated, one of the personalities, in fact, intended to kill Harold Sasko."

McLinn's attorney is asking for parole after 25 years, adding that he is looking at an appeal and that there are still mental health issues to address.

"I'll tell you this, there have been a couple of occasions where somebody else, who's a different personality, has talked to me. I am thoroughly convinced that she didn't know, you know under the law, that she couldn't form intent," Cornwell said.

Despite questions of mental health, the state feels the aggravating factors in the case are too much to allow McLinn parole before 50 years.

"We think, frankly, that the community and public deserve the safety of the Hard 50 sentence," Branson said.

McLinn's sentencing is set for April 29. If the judge finds her eligible for parole after 25 years, McLinn will be 45 years old when she could be released from prison. If a Hard 50 sentence is decided, McLinn will be 70 years old before she has the option of parole.

The local general election is just around the corner and candidates are busy campaigning to win a seat on the Lawrence City Commission.

Fourteen candidates set out to fill one of three seats. The primary election on March 3, narrowed the field to six candidates. The complete list of candidates still in the race includes: Stuart Boley, Matthew Herbert, Stan Rasmussen, Terry Riordan, Bob Schumm and Leslie Soden.

Current Commissioner Mike Dever elected not to run again. Commissioners Bob Schumm and Terry Riordan hope to retain their seats.

Stuart Boley is a newcomer to the city commission race. Boley feels his background as an IRS agent will greatly benefit the city as it faces budgetary issues. His campaign focuses, as he puts it, "the numbers." Boley also said he has an interest in listening to all sides of any given issue to determine the best course of action. Click here, to find out more about Boley's campaign.

Leading up to the general election, WOW! 6 will sit down with each of the candidates to find out more about their platforms.

Find out more about the candidates during the WOW! 6 Election Special on Tuesday, March 24. You can also catch all election coverage on www.6lawrence.com.

The general election is Tuesday, April 7.

With the general election less than a month away, candidates are busy campaigning to win a seat on the Lawrence City Commission.

Fourteen candidates set out to fill one of three seats. The primary election on March 3, narrowed the field to six candidates. The complete list of candidates still in the race includes: Stuart Boley, Matthew Herbert, Stan Rasmussen, Terry Riordan, Bob Schumm and Leslie Soden.

Current Commissioner Mike Dever elected not to run again. Commissioners Bob Schumm and Terry Riordan hope to retain their seats.

Dr. Terry Riordan said he decide to run again because he was encouraged to do so by people in the community. Riordan said he's taken the time to really listen and talk to people about their concerns, taking all the information he can to make the best decision. Riordan hopes to continue those efforts and in turn, encourage more transparency between the commission and Lawrence residents. Click here, to find out more about Riordan's campaign.

Leading up to the general election, WOW! 6 will sit down with each of the candidates to find out more about their platforms.

Find out more about the candidates during the WOW! 6 Election Special on Tuesday, March 24. You can also catch all election coverage on www.6lawrence.com.

The general election is Tuesday, April 7.

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